Workshops: Wednesday, September 20, 2017


Prevention

1A: The 2017 Utah SHARP Survey: Data Findings Beyond the Latest Profile Report
Mary Johnstun, MA, PMP, Director of Survey Services, Bach Harrison LLC

The latest 2017 Student Health and Risk Prevention (SHARP) Survey data have been released! This presentation will take a closer look at 2017 findings, specifically “hot topic” data related to subjects such as suicide, mental health, e-cigarettes, marijuana, and more. We’ll be looking at trend data for these subjects, as well as taking a closer look at data relationships between these topics in relation to risk and protective factors, substance use, depression, physical activity, and more. While this presentation is geared toward current SHARP-data-users, this presentation promises data gems for all conference attendees.

1B: E-Cigarettes – the Current Frontier**
Karlee Adams, MPA, Program Manager, Utah Department of Health; Braden Ainsworth, MPH, CPM, Health Program Manager, Utah Department of Health Tobacco Program

This presentation will provide participants with an update on the most current e-cigarette research, updated data for Utah, as well the current policy and regulatory environment.
**This workshop qualifies for ethics hours.

1C: Suicide Prevention**
Kevin Hines, Mental Health Advocate, Award-Winning Global Speaker, Bestselling Author and Documentary Filmmaker

Kevin Hines is a brain/mental health advocate, award-winning global speaker, bestselling author and documentary filmmaker who reaches audiences with his story of an unlikely survival and his strong will to live. Two years after he was diagnosed with bipolar disorder (19 years of age), he attempted to take his life by jumping from the Golden Gate Bridge. He is one of only thirty-four to survive the fall, and the only one to regain full physical mobility. He is the only Golden Gate Bridge jump survivor who is actively spreading the message of living mentally healthy. The fall would break his body, but not his spirit. Today, Kevin dedicates his life to saving lives by spreading the message of hope and sharing his art of living mentally well. He is one of the most respected and admired voices of lived experience. Kevin’s story is a remarkable testament to the strength of the human spirit and a reminder for us to love the life we have.
**This workshop qualifies for ethics hours.

Treatment

1D: Is Pharrell Williams Right? Is Happiness the Truth? Some Thoughts on Positive Psychology
David Rosengren, Ph.D., MINT and IAPP Member, President & CEO, Prevention Research Institute

This session introduces the concepts of positive psychology and the application of these ideas within substance use intervention and treatment settings. Participants will receive an overview of what positive psychology is, with a focus on the area of positive experiences. Through a series of brief activities, people will encounter the benefit of these positive experiences, as well as learning some of the building blocks of positive psychology. Because learning is at its best when the learner is highly engaged, the instructor will use a dynamic blend of didactic, discussion and exercises to communicate ideas, create experiences and extend these to the instructor/counselors work setting.

1E: Youth-in-Transition: Retention and Engagement**
Jason Burrow-Sanchez, Ph.D., Professor, University of Utah
The goal of this session is to provide participants with a framework for understanding, evaluating, and improving youth retention in their treatment programs. Participants will be encouraged to translate the material presented for use in their work settings.
**This workshop qualifies for ethics hours.

1F: Trauma and the Brain – The 5 Key Strategies for Healing – Part I**
Gordon Bruin, M.A. Clinical Psychology, LCMHC, Director of Clinical Services,The Younique Foundation, Innergold Online
This workshop will focus on how childhood trauma can affect the developing brain and become a root cause that leads to addiction. Drawing on the research of and in consultation with Bessel van der Kolk, M.D. and author of “The Body Keeps the Score,” Gordon will explore with the audience 5 key strategies that help survivors reclaim hope.
**This workshop qualifies for ethics hours.

1G: Neurobiology of Addiction**
Annette Fleckenstein, M.S., Ph.D., Professor, University of Utah
This workshop will include discussion of the neurobiology underlying addition, with a particular emphasis on stimulants, opioids, and cannabinoids.
**This workshop qualifies for ethics hours.

1H: Naloxone I of II: End-User Training**
Sam Plumb, MPA, MPH, Co-founder, Utah Naloxone; Jennifer Plumb, MD, MPH, Medical Director, Utah Naloxone
Attending Naloxone Session I is required to attend Naloxone Session II
End-User Naloxone Training: Workshop will review the state of the opioid epidemic in Utah, educate attendees on opiate overdose recognition, teach about the appropriate use of naloxone to reverse an opiate overdose, and review Utah laws relating to the use and distribution of naloxone. Attendees will be trained and prepared to use naloxone to reverse an opiate overdose after this training.
**This workshop qualifies for ethics hours.

1I: Mental Health Ethics**
Laura Thompson, J.D., CWLS, Assistant Attorney General, Office of the Utah Attorney General
In this workshop, we will explore a number of ethical scenarios, identify critical decision-making points and liability pitfalls, ultimately determining best courses of action for mental health and substance use disorder treatment professionals.
**This workshop qualifies for ethics hours.

Justice

1J: The Role of Attorneys in Substance Use Disorder Related Court Proceedings
Richard Nance, MSW Brigham Young University, MHA University of Alabama, Director of Utah County Department of Drug and Alcohol Prevention; Alan Sevison, JD, MA, Section Director / Assistant Attorney General; Dough Finch, Deputy Attorney for Utah County Attorney’s Office; Douglas Terry, J.D., Attorney; Kacy Borlik, JD, Attorney Guardian ad Litem
Since the 1970s, the war on drugs significantly changed the role of attorneys in criminal courts and juvenile courts. Attorneys attend drug related court proceedings representing the interests of the State, the offender, the victim, and children in the case of drug related child abuse and neglect cases. Developments in felony, family, and juvenile drug courts, pre-trial service programs, Utah’s Drug Offender Reform Act, and Justice Reinvestment Initiatives have given society new tools to more effectively address drug related criminal behavior, but they have forced attorneys to learn about the dynamics of drug use, various treatment approaches, and challenged their assumptions regarding their usual roles in court as the legal system has tried to cope with what is broadly accepted as a chronic disease. We will hear from Alan Sevison, Assistant Attorney General for the State of Utah, Kacy Borlik, Guardian ad Litem for the 4th District Juvenile Court, Doug Finch, Utah County Deputy Attorney, and Doug Terry of the Washington County Public Defender Association on their different perspectives in the process of handling drug related cases in the various courts.

1K: Solution Focused Approach for Criminal Justice Services: Solution Focused, Mindfulness, and Personal Responsibility – Part I
Desmond Lomax, MSC, CMHC, CPM, Director – Community Programming Unit, APP/Community Programming Unit

The training will address effective measures that will increase the accountability of your clients. Application of several clinical modalities will be address. Exercises will be demonstrated.


Prevention

2A: Combating The Rising Opioid Epidemic In America
Deven Bawden, PT, DPT, Doctor of Physical Therapy
Looking at the opioid epidemic in America and the way that healthcare providers play a vital role in the creation and elimination of the epidemic.

2B: Lessons Learned from Marijuana Legalization in Washington State
Sarah Mariani, CPP, DSHS, Behavioral Health Administrator
Since Washington State’s adoption of the nation’s first recreational marijuana laws in 2012 the prevention community has been working to offset the impacts of marijuana legalization on youth. In this session Ms. Mariani will review the lessons learned from medical and recreational marijuana legalization in Washington State. This includes funding mechanisms for prevention programs, reviewing data from youth surveys on marijuana use and perceived harms, looking at advertising restrictions of marijuana products, discussing the dangers of marijuana-infused edibles, providing updates on public education campaigns, reviewing the process for establishing the Evidence Based Practice (EBP) lists for marijuana prevention programs, and providing recommendations for efforts the prevention community can make to reduce the harm of marijuana legalization. Participants will gain an understanding of the prevention challenges from legalizing marijuana, and what early steps they can take to help reduce youth exposure, access, and EBP programs that are effective at decreasing marijuana use amongst youth. .

2C: Collaborative Leadership and Capacity Building to Enforce State Underage Drinking Laws in South Carolina
Michelle Nienhius, MPH, Prevention Coordinator, South Carolina Department of Alcohol and Other Drug Abuse Services
A component of creating healthy communities includes denying alcohol access to individuals less than 21 years old. This presentation will inform attendees about the statewide approach of addressing underage drinking at the local county level through the creation of Alcohol Enforcement Teams. The presentation will demonstrate the importance of developing partnerships to help educate and enforce the laws in South Carolina using best practices in environmental prevention.

Treatment

2D: Youth-in-Transition: Retention and Engagement**
Jason Burrow-Sanchez, Ph.D., Professor, University of Utah
The goal of this session is to provide participants with a framework for understanding, evaluating, and improving youth retention in their treatment programs. Participants will be encouraged to translate the material presented for use in their work settings.
**This workshop qualifies for ethics hours.

2E: Trauma and the Brain – The 5 Key Strategies for Healing – Part II**
Gordon Bruin, M.A. Clinical Psychology, LCMHC, Director of Clinical Services,The Younique Foundation, Innergold Online
This workshop will focus on how childhood trauma can affect the developing brain and become a root cause that leads to addiction. Drawing on the research of and in consultation with Bessel van der Kolk, M.D. and author of “The Body Keeps the Score,” Gordon will explore with the audience 5 key strategies that help survivors reclaim hope.
**This workshop qualifies for ethics hours.

2F: Cracking the Clinical Talent Code: Critical Elements in Coaching and Supervision
Darin Carver, MSW, LCSW, Clinical Practice Administrator, Weber Human Services
Is therapy a science or more of an art form? It turns out the answer doesn’t really matter because to be truly talented at either, therapists are going to have to practice differently and more frequently. Current supervision models tend to ignore the story neuroscience is telling about skill development. This session will highlight new ideas in supervision and clinical coaching that can yield better skills, and in turn, better client outcomes.

2G: Naloxone II of II: Train the Trainers**
Sam Plumb, MPA, MPH, Co-founder, Utah Naloxone; Jennifer Plumb, MD, MPH, Medical Director, Utah Naloxone; Peter Sadler
Attending Naloxone Session I is required to attend Naloxone Session II
End-User Naloxone Training: Workshop will review the state of the opioid epidemic in Utah, educate attendees on opiate overdose recognition, teach about the appropriate use of naloxone to reverse an opiate overdose, and review Utah laws relating to the use and distribution of naloxone. Attendees will be trained and prepared to use naloxone to reverse an opiate overdose after this training.
**This workshop qualifies for ethics hours.

2H: Addict to Artist; An Alternate Path of Recovery
Blu Robinson, SUDC, CMHC, Therapist Founder of Addict II Athlete
Addict to Artist is a support group that promotes the healing power of creative living in recovery. We aim to turn addiction’s destruction into sobriety’s success through the Erase and Replace Philosophy – erasing addiction and replacing it with something of greater value. We are a free community support group available to anyone touched by addiction. Whether you are in recovery yourself or have family or friends who have, or are currently battling addiction.

2I: A Providers Introduction to Substance Use Disorder Treatment for Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual, and Transgender Individuals**
Shanin Rapp, ASUDC, Grant Project Director, Utah State Division of Substance Abuse and Mental Health
This breakout session delivers a brief overview of a full-day curriculum that offers key terms and definitions, suggestions to address the specific needs of LGBT individuals, and treatment considerations for clinical work. This workshop is intended for mental health and substance use disorder clinicians, treatment providers, HIV providers, government employees, public health practitioners, prevention specialists and anyone in contact with LGBT individuals.
**This workshop qualifies for ethics hours.

Justice

2J: Growth Happens Here: Ten (or so) Things You Might Want to Know as a Practitioner
David Rosengren, Ph.D., MINT and IAPP Member, President & CEO, Prevention Research Institute
Prevention Research Institute (PRI) uses the tagline, Growth Happens Here, but what does that mean for me? This session draws from implementation science, positive psychology and leadership models and identifies ten or so ideas you might want to keep in mind as you move through this training conference, return to your organization and go about the job of making differences in people’s lives. Because learning is at its best when the learner is highly engaged, the instructor will use a dynamic blend of didactic, discussion and exercises to communicate ideas, create experiences and extend these to the instructor/counselors work setting.

2K: Solution Focused Approach for Criminal Justice Services: Solution Focused, MIndfulness, and Personal Responsibility
Desmond Lomax, MSC, CMHC, CPM, Director – Community Programming Unit, APP/Community Programming Unit
(Part I and Part II)
The training will address effective measures that will increase the accountability of your clients. Application of several clinical modalities will be address. Exercises will be demonstrated.


Prevention

3A: Integrating ACEs in Prevention Planning
Sarah Mariani, CPP, DSHS, Behavioral Health Administrator
During this session Ms. Mariani will provide a brief overview of the Adverse Childhood Experiences study, including what are ACEs, how to use this information in the prevention planning process and specifically how WA state prevention system has used the ACEs information in state and local planning.

3B: Alcohol Data Sources for Prevention Planning with an In-depth Look at Environmental Prevention Strategies
Anna Buckner, MPH, Alcohol Epidemiologist; Edward Ho, Ph.D., Director of Program Evaluation Services
This workshop will provide an overview of alcohol related data for prevention planning and surveillance, highlighting current trends related to alcohol use in Utah. Additionally, the workshop will discuss effective implementation of environmental prevention strategies that can help to reduce excessive alcohol use and related harms, including: describing environmental prevention strategies, discussing how data is used to advance environmental strategies, and providing examples and resources to help implementation of environmental prevention strategies in local areas.

3C: Lights, Camera, Action! Using iMovie to put a face on Prevention
Kye Nordfelt, Master of Public Administration, Licensed Prevention Specialist; & Logan Reid, Masters in Sociology, Licensed Prevention Specialist
When you view social media or online material, video is the key tool to get your attention. In this workshop you will learn about how to create simple video using iphone/imovie. We are not talking about expensive equipment, but we can show you examples of how we used simple equipment to better spread prevention message. We will be talking about Facebook Live, and give you an opportunity to practice editing.

Treatment

3D: Peer Support Supervision
Cami Roundy, CPSS, FRF, Recovery Resiliency and Peer Support Program Manager
An overview of Supervision for Peer Support Specialists and Mentoring for Family Resource Facilitators as pertaining to peers working with Substance Use Disorder. Discussion on the Utah programs, and questions that may come up for Supervisors/Mentors.

3E: The Deep Well: Clinical Skills for Reducing Compassion Fatigue**
Brian C. Miller, Ph.D., Director, Children’s Behavioral Health, Primary Children’s Hospital
The CE-CERT model identifies five key clinical practice skills for reducing compassion fatigue and secondary trauma, and sustaining a career in the helping professions. These are the skills we need to make ourselves more resilient to the secondary effects of intense experiences: 1) Engaging intense affect; 2) Decreasing rumination; 3) Conscious oversight of narrative; 4) Reducing emotional labor, and 5) Parasympathetic recovery. These are acquirable skills that can help us thrive in this difficult work.
**This workshop qualifies for ethics hours.

3F: Ethics: It Doesn’t Just Depend**
Greg Porter, LCSW, Administrative Director, Utah State Hospital; Stephen Phair, LCSW, Social Work Director, Utah State Hospital
The presenters will explore the cliffs, pitfalls, and crevasses that licensed professions tend to fall into as they navigate ethical dilemmas. The “Funnel Model” will be presented and explained that shows the progression of where to find the answers to maintain ethical safety.Most advice on how to deal with ethics questions ends up with the inevitable “it depends on the situation” line. If you are ready to move beyond that and find a guide for answering questions as a health professional then we have a show for you!
**This workshop qualifies for ethics hours.

3G: House Bill 239: Juvenile Justice Amendments
Pam Vickrey, Executive Director, Utah Juvenile Defender Attorneys; Cuong Nguyen, Juvenile Justice Specialist, Commission on Criminal and Juvenile Justice; Ruth Wilson, LCSW, Director, System of Care Director, Utah Department of Human Services; Dawn Marie Rubio, J.D., Utah Juvenile Court Administrator, Utah Administrative Office of the Courts; Doug Diamond, Chief, West Jordan Police Department; Steve Kaelin, Education Specialist, Utah State Board of Education
The HB239 presentation will include the overall policy changes to the Utah Juvenile Justice System, its impacts on schools and the law enforcement community. The presentation will explain changes to Substance Use Disorder Treatment requirements, Non-Judicial Adjustment, and School-Based Behavior provisions of the legislation. The presentation will also include an overview of resources and services catalog by judicial districts and a status update of the Juvenile Justice Oversight Committee, which is tasked with overseeing and coordinating the implementation of HB239.

3H: Neuroscience, Management and Building Trust in your Organization
Karen Dolan, MSW, University Of Utah, LCSW, CEO, Four Corners Community Behavioral Health, Inc.
Trust is the secret sauce. Building trust in your organization increases employee engagement, vastly decreases turnover, and boosts company productivity. Employees in high-trust organizations are more productive, have more energy at work, collaborate better with their colleagues, and stay with their employers longer than people working at low-trust companies. They also suffer less chronic stress and are happier with their lives, and these factors fuel stronger performance. This workshop will present some of the latest studies in Neuroscience and what they have to say about building trust in your organization. Participants will be trained in specific activities which can dramatically increase trust in their organization.

3I: The Effectiveness of Medically Assisted Treatment**
Mark Morgan, BA in Organization Communication, Advanced SUDC, Clinic Director, Discovery House in Salt Lake
This workshop is designed to assist providers in understanding the value and impact of Medically Assisted Treatments with opioid dependent individuals. Focus of the workshop will be methadone, buprenorphine, naloxone and new medications.
**This workshop qualifies for ethics hours.

Justice

3J: Connecting the Criminal Justice Population to Care
Seth Teague, BA Political Science, Masters Public Policy, Program Manager, Salt Lake County Behavioral Health Services; Jeannie Edens, BS, Associate Director, Salt Lake County Behavioral Health Services
Realizing their county had the same problem locally as nationally, that is, a disproportionate number of individuals with behavioral health conditions cycling through the criminal justice system, Salt Lake County went to work many years ago implementing alternatives to incarceration. This presentation will highlight policies guiding program selection and implementation, data collection and sharing currently underway, and efforts taken with newly awarded Justice Reinvestment Initiative dollars.

3K:  Naloxone across the system: Different system approaches to Naloxone**
Peter Sadler, MS, Program Manager, Utah Naloxone; Jim Keith, MBA, Chief, Washington City Police; Michael Fox, BA, EMTP, Medical Services Division Chief, Salt Lake City Fire Department; Sam Plumb, MPA, MPH, Co-founder, Utah Naloxone; Jennifer Plumb, MD, MPH, Medical Director, Utah Naloxone
Overview of successful naloxone efforts in the state of Utah from a community based organization perspective, an EMS perspective and a law enforcement perspective. Panelists will share their experiences as well as provide strategies for successful implementation in other communities statewide.
**This workshop qualifies for ethics hours.


Workshops: Thursday, September 21, 2017


Prevention

4A: Current and Future Directions for Drug Abuse Prevention in Higher Education
Richard Lucey, MA, Liberal Studies, Prevention Program Manager, Drug Enforcement Administration; Sean Fearns, BS, Mass Communications, Chief, Community Outreach and Prevention Support Section, Drug Enforcement Administration
This interactive session will provide an overview of drug use rates among college students and strategic approaches to prevention. The session also will include a summary of the Drug Enforcement Administration’s (DEA) community outreach and prevention support efforts. Attendees will be encouraged to share successes and challenges they face in preventing drug abuse among college students.

4B: Stop the Opidemic Campaign
Katie McMinn, MSC, Communication Coordinator, Utah Department of Health Violence and Injury Prevention Program; Angela Stander, BS, CHES, Opioid Overdose Prevention Coordinator, Utah Department of Health
The “Stop the Opidemic” public awareness campaign had several unique, innovative, and creative components which made it successful. Opioid abuse is a Utah epidemic. Stop the Opidemic is a campaign that expands public awareness and messaging about signs and symptoms of an opioid overdose and the opioid overdose antidote naloxone.

4C: Public Health and Substance Misuse Prevention: Oil and Water or Peanut Butter and Jelly?
Jennifer Hogge, LMFT, Prevention Coordinator, Weber Human Services; Bryce Sherwood, MHA, CHES, Health Promotion Supervisor, Weber-Morgan Health Department
Have you ever tried to mix water and oil before? It never lasts no matter how hard you shake or mix it. Public Health and Substance Misuse Prevention programs act like “water and oil” meaning they focus on different substances, speak different language and compete for funding. Instead of acting like water and oil, Public Health and Substance Misuse Prevention programs should act more like peanut butter and jelly. Is this even possible to collaborate and not compete? Are there ways to mix the two programs and have it be enjoyable, worthwhile and possibly more effective?

Treatment

4D: What Makes an Introvert an Introvert?**
Brian L. Currie, LCSW, Associate Director of Treatment Services, Salt Lake County Division of Behavioral Health
This course is designed for those who would like to have a better understanding of what an introvert actually is, even if you think you already know or have been an introvert your whole life. There will NOT be any focus during this session about dealing with introverts in treatment. So do you know if you are an introvert or an extrovert (most likely you are an ambivert)? (Please take this free test to see where you fall on the introvert/extrovert scale http://www.humanmetrics.com.) What determines this, is it nature or nurture? What makes an introvert so different than an extrovert? Why can’t an introvert just be more outgoing? Are all introverts (and extroverts) the same? If they could just overcome their shyness then introverts would be able to fit in, right? Can an introvert be a leader?
**This workshop qualifies for ethics hours.

4E: Living Well: Adopting Blue Zone Practices
Christine Gianchetta-Nguyen, Bachelors of Sociology/Psychology, Medicaid Housing Coordinator
We will explore the importance of promoting health and wellness in our lives. The factors creating a life well lived are of benefit to each of us as well as to those we serve. We are learning the body keeps score, we are also aware we have the opportunity to make things better. A small amount of adjustment can make all of the difference…it’s not over until it’s over!

4F: Drug Symptomology and Street Development
Rudy Chacon, LEO, Detective, Unified Police Department
This workshop will provide a brief overview of the physical characteristics, paraphernalia associated with and the symptoms caused by, the use of commonly abused controlled substances.

4G: The Scoop on Working with Media
Heather Barnum, APR, MPA, Communications Director, Utah Department Human Services
Uh, um, ya know…Get ready to gain confidence and get your treatment message ready to share with media and on social media in this interactive session. Learn how to “pitch” newsworthy stories, the power of fewer messages, interview techniques and strategies for responding in a crisis or on a negative story.

4H: Harm Reduction 101**
Mindy Vincent, Masters of Social Work, Licensed Clinical Social Worker, Masters of Public Administration Candidate, Executive Director, Utah Harm Reduction Coalition
Harm Reduction is a client centered philosophy that focuses on reducing the harms of substance abuse. Please join us for a discussion about this often misunderstood and misinterpreted method of practice and learn how to use harm reduction as a tool in combatting our ever growing opioid crisis.
**This workshop qualifies for ethics hours.

4I: Lessons Learned from the Utah Trauma Academy**
Gabriella Grant, MA, Director, California Center – Trauma Informed Care
This workshop describes the pioneering Utah Trauma Academy from its inception to completion. It also looks at some of the data and findings and offers recommendations for replication. Utah may offer the Utah Trauma Academy again in 2019.
**This workshop qualifies for ethics hours.

Justice

4J: Level of Service/Risk, Need, Responsivity – How it Applies to Programming
Angela Hendrix, BS, ASUDC, CPM, Adult Probation & Parole Supervisor, Utah Department of Corrections; Greg Hendrix, LCSW, Programming Deputy Warden, Utah Department of Corrections
An update regarding the use of the LS/RNR for programming purposes within the Department of Corrections will be presented. How is it being used for treatment placement, planning and determining successful treatment completion will be the topic of discussion?

4K: LEAD: Law Enforcement Assisted Diversion Getting better outcomes by moving people out of the criminal justice system
Kris Nyrop, MA, LEAD National Support Director, Public Defender Association
LEAD was begun in Seattle, WA in 2011 as pilot program focused on diverting low-level drug-offenders to intensive harm reduction-based case management. This presentation will describe how and why LEAD came to be, what it is, and how it has been adapted and adopted in jurisdictions from Maine to Hawaii and discuss its promise as a more effective approach to individuals with behavioral health issues related to substance use and/or mental illness.


Prevention

5A: Working with Hospitals – Community Efforts
Lisa Nichols, Intermountain Healthcare Community Health Partnership Director; Amber Rich, Intermountain Healthcare Regional Manager Community Health
An overview of strategies and advantages of cooperative efforts between health care and community agencies in substance abuse prevention. Presentation includes examples of system-wide hospital efforts as well as local hospital collaborations. A brief explanation of community benefit at not-for-profit hospitals and how it can be leveraged to build and enhance community substance abuse efforts.

5B: How can we help more smokers quit? Broadening the reach of evidence-based tobacco cessation treatments
Cho Lam, Ph.D., Research Associate Professor, Huntsman Cancer Institute; David Wetter, Professor and Director, University of Utah
Persons with mental illness smoke at a much higher rate than those without mental disorders. However, tobacco use is not being assessed or addressed routinely in community mental health centers. This presentation will discuss efforts to 1) implement a tobacco-free campus policy across >200 community mental health centers across Texas, 2) educate staff at these centers about the hazards of tobacco use, 3) train providers at these centers to assess and treat tobacco use, and 3) increase centers access to specialized tobacco cessation treatment practices.

5C: Community Centered Evidence Based Prevention
Rob Timmerman, B.A., Certified Prevention Specialist, PFS Regional Prevention Director, DSAMH – Salt Lake County Health Department
We know what works! Community Centered Evidence Based Prevention planned strategically and focusing on the 3 P’s; Programs, Practices, and Policies gives us comprehensive prevention. Learn how coalitions can be more effective by working together and being smarter.

Treatment

5D: I Love Me, I Love Me Not**
Greg Hendrix, LCSW, Programming Deputy Warden, Utah Department of Corrections
Learn how to accept who you are without needing the conditions of approval or acceptance from others or perceived societal, religious or familial norms or measuring sticks. During this presentation you will learn a model to help you and your clients identify and work through shame.
**This workshop qualifies for ethics hours.

5E: Strengthening the Fragile Vagal Brake: Understanding How Trauma Affects the Social Engagement System**
Gabriella Grant, MA, Director, California Center – Trauma Informed Care
This workshop discusses the PolyVagal Theory with regards to its role in the development of substance abuse issues. Strengthening the vagal nerve could result in reduced use and reliance on substances. Several ideas and discussions to see if this pyschoimmunophysiological approach may be helpful.
**This workshop qualifies for ethics hours.

5F: Refugees Around the World: Quest For Freedom and Safety**
Samuel (Son) Nguyen, Network Design Specialist/Refugee, IT Designer, BNA Consulting; Christine Gianchetta-Nguyen, Bachelors of Sociology/Psychology, Medicaid Housing Coordinator
Refugees flee the dangers of their homeland to create a safe and secure life. What causes people to flee? Is it possible to create a new refuge in a different culture? How do you assimilate as well as hang on to your own cultural identity…and how important is it? What do those working to assist in this process need to know as individuals and families begin to build their new lives?
**This workshop qualifies for ethics hours.

5G: Working with Introverts in SUD Treatment**
Brian L. Currie, LCSW, Associate Director of Treatment Services, Salt Lake County Division of Behavioral Health
The focus of this course assumes the participant has a good working knowledge of introverts. If you have not STUDIED about introverts it is HIGHLY recommended that you attend the “What makes an Introvert an introvert?” session. This course will examine why introverts are at a disadvantage the moment upon entering treatment, and remains this way during the whole course of treatment. It will also suggest ways the provider can adapt their program to the needs of the introvert to increase their chances of success in the program.
**This workshop qualifies for ethics hours.

5H: Syringe Exchange in Utah: Planning, Implementation and Practice
Heather Bush, B.S., Syringe Exchange Program Coordinator, Utah Department of Health; Amelia Prebish, MPH, Volunteer, UHRC; Mindy Vincent, Masters of Social Work, Licensed Clinical Social Worker, Masters of Public Administration Candidate, Executive Director, Utah Harm Reduction Coalition
Syringe Exchange Programs (SEPS) were legalized in Utah in 2016 and were implemented in December of the same year. We will be discussing the IDU needs assessment, the law, implementation of the program, real and expected outcomes as well as barriers.

5I: Positive Vocabulary and Recovery Oriented Language
Edward Schwartz, Project Coordinator/Peer Recovery Coach – Recovery Leadership Initiative; Utah Support Advocates for Recovery Awareness (USARA); Tara Wilder, Certified Peer Support Specialist, Family Resource Facilitator, Mental Health First Aid Instructor, Recovery Coach, Client Care Coordinator, Utah Support Advocates for Recovery Awareness, Four Corners Behavioral Health
The energetic and enthusiastic presenters of this workshop will lay the foundation for new conversations using positive vocabulary and recovery oriented language. This progressive communication style will open the door for new pathways within the clinical and treatment communities. When properly integrated into practice, these will assist in reducing stigma associated with substance use and mental health challenges. Our Language and Voice Matter!

Justice

5J: Human Trafficking: An Often Overlooked Pediatric Crisis**
Corey Rood, MD, Child Abuse Pediatrician, University of Utah and Primary Children’s Hospital
Human Trafficking: Human trafficking is a major global public health problem affecting adults and children from at least 152 different countries worldwide, including the United States. It is estimated that 100,000-300,000 youth in the U.S. are vulnerable to domestic trafficking. When crimes of a sexual nature are committed against children (<18 years) for financial or other economic reasons, the crime is defined as commercial sexual exploitation of children (CSEC) and may be either domestic or transnational. Current research indicates that victims of trafficking often experience severe emotional and physical effects of their victimization, including physical injuries, infections, HIV/AIDS, malnutrition, unwanted pregnancy, drug and alcohol abuse, PTSD and major depression with suicidality. Educated community service providers, law enforcement, legal community and juvenile justice, social workers, therapists, and health care professionals are in a unique position to identify those in need, report their concerns to the appropriate government agencies, work with multidisciplinary teams to tackle this problem locally, and offer and recommend much needed medical, therapy, and rehabilitative services.
**This workshop qualifies for ethics hours.

5K: Effective Strategies for Individual interventions**
Myrinda Schweitzer Smith, Ph.D., Deputy Director, University of Cincinnati Corrections Institute
This workshop will provide an overview of what works to change behavior. Focus will be placed on key strategies for one-on-one interventions. A structured approach to changing behavior will be shared and an example model provided.
**This workshop qualifies for ethics hours.


Prevention

6A: Parents Empowered and Way to Quit?
Steve Wright; Kyle Curtis; Karlee Adams, MPA, Program Manager, Utah Department of Health; Sara Quintero
Description pending…

6B: Leading a Strengths-based Team
Heather Barnum, APR, MPA, Communications Director, Utah Department Human Services
Decades of Gallup Research shows team members are 73% more likely to be engaged when you recognize and utilize their strengths effectively. Learn in this lively presentation why there is not one set of “leadership qualities,” how to harness the collective strengths of your coalition, boards and teams in a strengths-based way, and what four things are critical for you to engage followers in your vision.

6C: What’s Happening? DEA in Utah
Brian Besser, District Agent in Charge, U.S. Drug Enforcement Administration (DEA)
Overview of current trends and concerns with DEA in the State of Utah: local opioid epidemic; counterfeit tableting operations; the DEA-360 Strategy; etc.

Treatment

6D: I Love Me, I Love Me Not**
Greg Hendrix, LCSW, Programming Deputy Warden, Utah Department of Corrections
Learn how to accept who you are without needing the conditions of approval or acceptance from others or perceived societal, religious or familial norms or measuring sticks. During this presentation you will learn a model to help you and your clients identify and work through shame.
**This workshop qualifies for ethics hours.

6E: Improving Fidelity to Evidence-Based Models in Human Service Organizations
Rob Butters, LCSW, Ph.D., Asst. Professor and Director, Utah Criminal Justice Center
This workshop with focus on the challenges to implementing and maintaining adherence to evidence-based treatment models. Using experience in evaluating human service organizations over the last decade, and principles of adult learning and continuous improvement, the workshop will provide strategies and suggestions to improve adherence and fidelity.

6F: Minors and Drug Facilitated Sexual Assault
Corey Rood, MD, Child Abuse Pediatrician, University of Utah and Primary Children’s Hospital
Minors and DFSA: Sexual assault and abuse affect thousands of children and teens in this country each year. Many of these sexual assaults are facilitated by ever more prevalent substances such as alcohol, opiates, benzodiazepenes, marijuana, and even over-the-counter medications. What are the more prevalent substances seen today facilitating sexual assaults among minors, what substances should be ever more on our radar, and what substances can the Utah Forensic Toxicology Lab test for.

6G: Effective Strategies for Individual interventions**
Myrinda Schweitzer Smith, Ph.D., Deputy Director, University of Cincinnati Corrections Institute
This workshop will provide an overview of what works to change behavior. Focus will be placed on key strategies for one-on-one interventions. A structured approach to changing behavior will be shared and an example model provided.
**This workshop qualifies for ethics hours.

6H: Discussing What Works for Native American Clients: “Evidence Based” vs. “Experience Based” **
Kristina Groves & Rachael Groves
Although evidence-based treatment is viewed as the gold standard for achieving the best outcomes for clients, what do you do when there is little to no evidence that fidelity to a treatment protocol is best practice for a specific demographic? For Native Americans, there is limited research in our communities showing that mainstream treatment works as prescribed. This session will discuss what we have learned working in an urban Native American adult substance abuse treatment and mental health center, an outpatient tribal community agency (on the reservation) and working with Native American youth in a non-Native residential treatment center. We will also discuss our experiences using and modifying several mainstream treatment modalities to make them culturally relevant, as well as the role that we’ve seen trauma play in substance use disorders among Native Americans.
**This workshop qualifies for ethics hours.

6I: Target Zero: The Intersection of Substance Use and Suicide**
Kim Myers, MSW, Utah Suicide Prevention Coordinator, Utah Division of Substance Abuse and Mental Health; Taryn Hiatt, BS Suicide Prevention trainer safeTALK, Mental Health First Aid, CONNECT Postvention, Working Minds, Area Director Utah and Nevada, American Foundation for Suicide Prevention
In this workshop we will: Review the problem of suicide in Utah and the role of substance use and abuse. Discuss the role of substance use treatment providers in suicide prevention. Learn to create an effective comprehensive and collaborative safety plan with someone at risk for suicide including reducing access to lethal means.
**This workshop qualifies for ethics hours.

Justice

6J: Drug Symptomology and Street Development
Rudy Chacon, LEO, Detective, Unified Police Department
This workshop will provide a brief overview of the physical characteristics, paraphernalia associated with and the symptoms caused by, the use of commonly abused controlled substances.

6K: Naltrexone Drug Court Observation Project
Cameron Williams, MD, Medical Provider, Carbon County; Kara Cunningham, Program Director, Four Corners Community Behavioral Health; Jeff Wood, Law Enforcement Officer and Sheriff; Jeremy Humes, Deputy County Attorney
Describe the development of MAT in Corrections transitioning to Drug court. Development, Process and Progress.